MRA Project Manager Dave Scanlan Discusses Manitoba Mountain Restoration Project

3 Mar 2011

The Rider's Voice

For more information, please visit Manitoba Mountain, Spirit of the Kenai

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15 Responses to “MRA Project Manager Dave Scanlan Discusses Manitoba Mountain Restoration Project”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    MRA: I am interested in your plans for a Manitoba Mtn. restoration. I am wondering why MRA and Dave Scanlan have chosen to not seek public input from the 3 closest towns to Summit Lake prior to going public with this plan.

    I find it a bit presumptuous that one resident of the Kenai partnered with an Outside entity have suddenly found the true economic Salvation for the Upper Kenai Peninsula, deeming it “a necessity”, without first presenting the concept to those who stand to be the most affected.

    Many lifelong Alaskans, as well as “cheechakos” (Alaskans formerly from Outside), are quite happy to live ,by choice, in remote , economically depressed communties that lack amenities, yet still find ways to get plenty of turns without dependence on a ski lift,as well as enjoy a quality of life that could most likely not be replicated elsewhere.

    Even Anchorage, with nearly half of the entire state’s population, (around 280,00) can barely sustain a non profit ski club, Alpenglow, that exists in the front range of Anchorage’s back yard. However ,part of that may be attributed to inconsistent snow amounts and quality. What information do you have that leads you to believe Manitoba will be a finacial sucsess?

    As it stands, you appear to have very little in the way of actual input from Alaskans, while at the same time , lobbying the world for support, boasting (loosely quoted) the best terrain this side of the Alps, all the while pressing forward with your head lowered and the blinders on, littering the trail with warm and fuzzy feel good eco buzz words. Who really stands to gain from this? And what will be gained? Will it far outweigh what could potentially be lost? What do you really want? Just to get to the goods without going to Alyeska, or using a heli, or using a snowmachine ,or using human power?

    Call me old fashioned, but I would prefer to see Local suuport take place first before the call is made to gain the support of the world via the internet.

    I am also interested in your thoughts regarding how your plan conflicts with the public comments that drafted the most recent Winter Managemt Plan for the area.

    I did not see the permission of uphill skiing within resort boundries listed on your newest video. Is it safe to assume that the public will stand to be denied free non-lift access to Manitoba? Being one of the few relatively avalanche safe back country ski locations along the Turnagain Pass highway corridor, making its useage fee based may seem quite infringing to residents of an already economically stressed region.

    How much will your alternative energy sources offset the carbon footprint
    left in the wake of your client base traveling from around Alaska and the globe to reach Manitoba and the energy required to operate it? It is around 180 miles roundtrip from Anchorage. Will there be daily shuttles from Anchorage? Seward? Kenai? Will there be a program to transport and supervise local youth to the ski area?

    How much are you estimating for ticket prices? Season’s Passes? What will be the minimum buy in amount a rider will have to invest as a shareholder? Will it be affordable? Are you aware (citing recent US Census statistics) that a large percentage of your target demograph have an annual income below poverty level? Any projections as to how many daily lift tickets or seasons passes would need to be sold to break even annually?

    When will you be presenting the formula equating a Manitoba ski area to economic stability for the localized Manitoba region? For this, what appears to be your biggest marketing pitch, I most eagerly await a factual reply.

    I would find it helpful to hear the personal reasons that have led Dave Scanlan to invest his time and energy into a number of previous “visions” for mechanized ski lifts in the general Turnagain Pass – Summit Lake corridor, and why establishing such an area remains so important and pressing to him.

    I would encourage you to provide an online resource with in depth details of your master plan , and a resource in which the public can present questions and comments as well as hear your responses. Perhaps you can arange a live video conference on the web, using Skype and Ustream, for those that could not attend your Girdwood presentation.

    These are just a few of my thoughts and concerns regarding your plan.I am whole-heartedly remaining optimistic , and will be following the progression of your proposal. I love mountains,and i love to recreate in the mountains. I love Alaska. I also recognize the value of remoteness, peacefulness, tranquility, accessability, and the availability of plenty of fresh powder for everyone without fighting for or paying for turns. I am a realist, and i recognize that achiveing balance and harmony among all these things will be a lengthy and arduous challenge. Good luck!

    I am eagerly awaiting your answers to the questions i have posed., and look forward to a healthy dialogue in the future. You have some great ideas and goals, however i’m not yet convinced that Manitoba is the best place for you to see them to fruition.

    Cheers!

    SR

    Reply

    • Dscanlan Says:

      I will respond below to your excellent questions that we talked about two nights ago on the road.

      “MRA: I am interested in your plans for a Manitoba Mtn. restoration. I am wondering why MRA and Dave Scanlan have chosen to not seek public input from the 3 closest towns to Summit Lake prior to going public with this plan.”

      I think there is a little misunderstanding here as far as us not seeking public input from the 3 closest towns. This is in fact what we are doing right now! To give a little quick back history on how this developed for those that don’t know me.
      I originally got involved back in late 2005 when the community members of Cooper Landing came to me asking me to help them develop some downhill skiing opportunities for them on Bone Mountain at the back of Snug Harbor road. During this time, I attended many meetings in Cooper Landing where we discussed the Concept with these residents. At that point in time Cooper Landing updated there Economic Development Action Plan where they identified Ski Area Development as one of there top priorities. This was done through advertised public meetings. As we developed the Snug Harbor concept the Forest Service actually advised us that development of this sort of project in the Summit Lake Area would be more consistent with the Forest Service Plan since there is back history of two different historic developed ski areas. During this time I also involved people from Hope to be on our Board of Directors of the Non Profit that we established, the Kenai Peninsula Community Ski Foundation. Ultimately after the 16 months of review by the Federal Government our non profit 501(c)(3) request was denied. At the same point our business attorney had been called back to active duty in Iraq, my wife and I had just launched our new business, another board memeber, Bianca, had just had her first baby and so our push forward ended as nobody involved had the extra time to volunteer on the project.
      Fast forward five years. I get this email from a guy in Argentina Jamie Schectman, who heard of our efforts and wanted to talk about assisting us with our concept. Jamie seemed to have the same passion for skiing and community focused development that I have, and a new relationship was born.
      Fast forward another year and we come to where we are at right now. So in order for people to truly comment on a project, the conceptualization needs to be taken far enough through the initial stages to have a pretty good frame work of how the project is going to be layed out, financed, and operated. With out this there is no discussion. Most people that plan a development project will not come to the local people for input until the governing agencies put out there required public comment period during the permitting process. Since MRA’s main focus is on the community we have decided that we would reach out to the public at least once before even having our initial preapplication meeting with the Forest Service and the State of Alaska DNR. This meeting happened on the 25th of February the DAY AFTER our first public outreach meeting.
      So you ask why was the meeting in Girdwood? This comes down to pure logistics. It wasn’t until about three weeks ago that we realized that we may finally, after a year of hard volunteer work, be ready to bring our conceptualized project before the people and the governing agencies, and wanted to be able to do this when the people from MRA were up for our think tank session. The Girdwood Community hall was chosen as a location simply because it was available, heated, large enough to hold the people that would be interested enough to attend, and was equipped with an awesome audio visual system. This was not done to slight anyone. We have scheduled for the Cooper Landing Community Club meeting on March 24th, are waiting to hear back for a date to present at the Moose Pass Advisory Planning Commission Meeting, and are looking at a possible date of March 23rd for a presentation at the Hope Social Hall, since we don’t want to wait to the next Hope Inc. meeting on May 7. As you can see most of these presentations in the local communities have been tied to the scheduled meetings of these communities official bodies and couldn’t be scheduled with only two weeks notice as we did at the Girdwood Community Center.

      “I find it a bit presumptuous that one resident of the Kenai partnered with an Outside entity have suddenly found the true economic Salvation for the Upper Kenai Peninsula, without first presenting the concept to those who stand to be the most affected.”

      You know me Dingo, I may be one resident, but as Chair of the Hope/Sunrise Land Use Advisory Planning Commission, and with my wife Lana now as Secretary of Hope Inc. Rest assured that I have had many many conversations in and out of public meetings on ways to help the winter economies of Hope/Sunrise, Cooper Landing, and Moose Pass. Everyone I have talked to in these towns have been very very supportive of the idea!
      The Manitoba Mountain Ski Area Restoration Project by itself in not going to be the true economic salvation for the East District of the Kenai Peninsula, but it’s a start. It’s only going to happen if the local people can get involved and take ownership in this project and continue to be forward thinking in planning for the future. We can’t expect the Borough or the State or the Forest Service to bring us Salvation. It is up to us the local residents to figure out what our personality is going to be for the future. This project is one thing that we can do that may help our town’s survive into the future especially for those of us that want to make a living in our towns and not have to leave for eight months at a time for work.

      “Call me old fashioned, but I would prefer to see Local support take place first before the call is made to gain the support of the world via the internet.”

      I can understand this, but the fact of the matter is that we are going to need the support of the outside world to help us fund this project. Funding is not easy and if quality people want to help us then who am I to turn them away. The people involved in MRA are super top notch individuals that I’m proud to now be friends with and I think all of us would probably feel the same way after hanging out and riding some pow together.
      The other aspect to this is that the Manitoba Project is just one project the MRA is looking at in addition to projects in Canada, Argentina, Montana, and Wyoming. So in calling out for support from the world MRA is also promoting the bigger picture with MRA building its identity and brand awareness to the world to support this bigger picture of making skiing affordable to the common people of small mountain towns across the world.
      So I guess again it was a matter of timing we didn’t finish our power point presentation until two days before the Girdwood presentation. I assure you I’m trying as hard as I can to involve everyone and to be as transparent as possible. I’m doing this all on my own dime and time so give me a chance.

      “I am also interested your thoughts regarding how your plan conflicts with the public comments that drafted the most recent Winter Management Plan for the area.”

      Well there were many points brought up at these meeting three of which Lana and I attended, none of which you attended. There was a lot of heated discussion brought forth at these meetings with a large anti snowmachine campaign with full on posters and stickers plastered all over. However, I don’t think that it’s fair to say that it conflicts with this public comment period when the sole focus of these public comments where revolving around Snowmachine use or Non-Snowmachine use. Not once did any of the facilitators of these meetings ask people to discuss whether or not the people would like to see a community owned T-Bar in the Manitoba area.
      There was also significant comment from snowmachine users from Hope, Cooper Landing, and Moose Pass about protecting there right for traditional uses of snowmachines i.e. bird hunting, rabbit hunting, and trapping. This is why the snowmachine corridor was established along the side of the highway. So I guess I’m not to clear on the conflict because lifts weren’t talked about and traditional use snowmachine access was incorporated into the plan.
      People also grow and change in their understanding of needs and uses of our wilderness. I know some of the biggest pushers of the anti movement six years ago have now move down to the Peninsula, have had children and seem to have a new view on these issues. When we actually enter into the permitting phase many new public scoping meetings will happen with the focus being on the issues at hand. Let’s not be so stuck on the past and start looking into the future with open minds and hearts.
      I think this would also be a good time to point out the fact that our project could decrease the number of snowmachines in our mountains. We all know how many people have purchased snowmachines in the last six years because they can get more powder with out the regulation. Could it be that when people see the excellent access that we are planning to provide that they won’t see the need to spend $8,000 on a snowmachine that burns five gallons of gas per day out of a dirty two stroke snowmachine.
      Could it also be that the backcountry skiing in Turnagain Pass and the rest of the Summit Lake Megatoba corridor may be improved because a percentage of the current user days will prefer to access the terrain that is currently seldom used in the Block Creek, Wilson Creek, Weber Creek, Roaring Creek, Juneau Creek, Timberline Creek, Mills Creek and Lynx Creek Drainage’s. Some states would think they were lucky to only have all of the terrain that I just listed that we barely use. Wow, we sure do have a lot of mountains.

      “I did not see the permission of uphill skiing within resort boundries listed on your newest video. Is it safe to assume that the public will stand to be denied free non-lift access to Manitoba? Being one of the few relatively avalanche safe back country ski locations accessed by the highway system, making its usage fee based may seem quite infringing to residents of an already economically stressed region.”

      Good question. I do not believe that the insurance company will not allow uphill traffic with in our permitted Ski Area boundary however, this is the reason that the current mills creek road that everyone uses to hike into the area will be left out of the ski area boundaries. This will allow us to keep access open to the Mills Creek/ Spirit Walker zone. People will also be allowed to use the Nordic trail that will run down Canyon Creek to be able to skin to little Toba. This mountain is equally as avalanche safe as Manitoba.
      We are also planning to install a suspension bridge over Canyon creek near the Junction of Roaring Creek to open up a whole new quadrant for people that like to skin. This bridge also gives return access for backcountry skiers to return to the highway for a ride back to the Manitoba Base Area.
      We will also offer a super cheap one ride backcountry access lift ticket option to allow backcountry enthusiast to leave ski area boundaries. Our backcountry gate will always be open!!!

      “How much will your alternative energy sources offset the carbon footprint
      left in the wake of your client base traveling from around Alaska and the globe to reach Manitoba and the energy required to operate it?”

      This is not my specialty. I leave these formulas to the alternative energy wizzes that work with MRA. Once we get some energy experts to Analise the potential of our wind, hydro, and solar opportunities we will have a better grasp on this data. The fact is, that we have this in our long term goal. Most businesses would never even consider it. Being that we will be only running surface lifts our energy need to operate should be fairly low.

      Which one of your snowmachines that you use to go snowboarding every day puts out less carbon? Your 2001 Summit 800, Your 2007 Summit 1000, or your 2009 Summit 800 just to service one person?

      “When will you be presenting the formula equating to economic stability for the localized Manitoba region?”

      Initially the economic stability will come in the form of new local jobs for the three communities. We figure that we will be able to provide around fifteen new jobs directly at the ski hill. Then when fellow high angle ski enthusiasts start to come up for visits many additional jobs will be created to house, feed, equip, and guide these fellow ski enthusiasts.
      We have also been talking with the owner of Summit Lake Lodge about the possibility of leasing us his lodge to operate during the winter once again. I don’t know if you remember when the lodge was still open. I think that happened after you moved to Hope, but it was really enjoyed be a lot of the people of hope as a cool spot to go out for dinner and drinks with friends from Moose Pass and Cooper Landing. Not to mention getting a garbage grinder and a beer after a good day touring in the mountains. This would create another 12 to 15 jobs.
      So my formula equating to economic stability is to create thirty new jobs within two years. If there is only 5 jobs currently available in Hope then I think this formula is pretty sound. This is how our county can be great again. We need to get off of our Laurels and TRY! Nobody is going to do it for us. The republicans certainly didn’t and the democrats haven’t done any better.

      “I would encourage you to provide an on line resource with in depth details of your plan , and a resource in which the public can present questions and comments as well as hear your responses. Perhaps you can arrange a live video conference on the web, using Skype and Ustream, for those that could not attend your Girdwood presentation.”

      As far as an on line resource with in depth details. I’m not a web tech guru. I don’t even have a facebook page, I don’t twitter, skype or post on chat rooms. However, the web tech guys with MRA are working on it right now. We are all volunteers so please be patient.
      I really like your idea for Skype Conference or something like that. I’m willing to learn about how to do this if people have an interest in it. Maybe we can set One day a month where anyone could log on the the Skype Conference so I could answer any questions or concerns and give project updates.

      “These are just a few of my thoughts and concerns regarding your plan.I am whole-heartedly remaining optimistic , and will be following the progression of your proposal. I love mountains,and i love to recreate in the mountains. I love Alaska. I also recognize the value of remoteness, peacefulness, tranquility, accessability, and the availability of plenty of fresh powder for everyone without fighting for or paying for turns. I am a realist, and i recognize that achiveing balance and harmony among all these things will be quite a challange. Good luck!”

      I’m glad that you are optimistic about the plan. I respect your dedication to your riding experience. I appreciate that there have been fewer aggressive confrontations with others that come to ride your zone as well as less stickering of vehicles at the local trail head. As you know I’m extremely passionate about skiing and happen to also be passionate about sharing the experience that I love so much with others!
      I’m confident that if people can open up their minds and hearts we can achieve the balance and harmony that we all desire. With 8 to 10 thousand acres of high angle terrain out there we will all have a lot of work to do to pack all of that powder down in between storm cycles. There are so many huge faces to be skied that there will be no fight needed for the powder especially for locals that know how to make the best out of our lift system.
      As far as paying for turns. We all do it, you pay to fuel your snowmachine every morning. Some people buy a lift ticket, some put gas in their cars to drive to the parking lot at Tincan. We are still trying to nail down our pass pricing but we are trying to target a $200 pass for people that purchase at least one ownership share. That would equate to fueling up your sled 11 times. Seems pretty reasonable to me.

      I strongly urge you and anyone else to attend one of our public forum meetings. The meetings will only be as good as the people that attend and the questions that get raised. I know many of you don’t like social situations, sitting in boring meetings, or speaking your views in front of a crowd of strangers, but your questions may stimulate someone else attending to ask a follow up question or to see a different view point. I know this may be shocking but there is a huge number of Alaskan Skiers that have never heard of Telemark Tips.
      We are also handing out surveys after each meeting to solicit further public comment. After all of the initial meetings we will also be mailing out surveys to every box holder in Moose Pass, Cooper Landing, and Hope to make sure everyone has a chance to have there views heard. Hopefully we will have all surveys back and analysed by the first of June. Once this is completed we will enter into the official permitting process with the State of Alaska.
      I will try and post replies every Friday. I’m not trying to avoid anyone. I volunteer on this project and am run our own T-shirt company that my wife and I operate so I don’t have time to scour the web every eight hour posting replies this is why you don’t see me posting on the ski chat rooms. I hope that this is understandable to all of you that are following the project.

      Thanks for being involved
      Pray for snow!!!

      Reply

      • Anonymous Says:

        Dave – you wrote “People also grow and change in their understanding of needs and uses of our wilderness. I know some of the biggest pushers of the anti movement six years ago have now move down to the Peninsula, have had children and seem to have a new view on these issues. ”
        I’m guessing that you’re talking about BJS since she was one of the people who spear-headed the push to make Manitoba and the surrounding areas a non-motorized area (and has since moved to Moose Pass). Does she know that you’re speaking for her on a public forum?
        Unless you have her endorsement I’d be really careful claiming that she “seems to have a new view on these issues”.

        Reply

        • Dscanlan Says:

          wfinley, I appoligize for making that statement as it does sound that way. I would never want to speak for anyone or intentionally wrong them. I was thinking in a generalized way of how peoples lives tend to change as the situations in their lives change. My wife is a classic example. She used to be extremely anti snowmachine would make calls to the forest service reporting incidents and she also tried to shut down the whole area from Summit to Manitoba ten years before BJS, but as our lives have changed our views on multiple uses have also changed. My wife would love to talk with you about this. She talked with tons of people about this during her five winters working at Summit Lake Lodge.
          So I understand that there was a lot of comment and many meetings about the Winter Recreation Plan of 2005 three of which I attended however, I would like to focus on peoples views that will come out of the upcoming meetings, and the meetings that will be done in association with our Environmental Impact Study. We want to get this project right and in order to do that we need to get good current input from the people from throughout the whole region. We have just started this process. The world is a much different place now than it was six years ago.
          I hope you will be able to make one of our meetings.

          Reply

  2. Bob Scanlan Says:

    Sounds like a fantastic opportunity to provide another ski experience as well as business ventrues for Cooper Landing, Hope, Sunrise, Summit Lake, and perhaps Seward. All in all it looks good–go for it.

    RBS

    Reply

  3. Anonymous Says:

    How does one go about getting any factual information from this group??? You do not reply to questions online anywhere you are posting stuff, nor have you replied to any direct emails. WTF does someone have to do to get some FACTS from you???

    Reply

    • Dscanlan Says:

      Dan I can’t believe that you had to WTF me. Don’t get your panties in a bunch. We had what I thought was a friendly conversation on the side of the road as we were walking our dogs with our fabulous wives on Wednesday night where you asked me all of the questions that you posed above.

      Then I get the email from you Thursday night about midnight right before I go to bed. Wake up Friday morning have to finish a T-shirt account before we go to Anchorage. Get home from Anchorage and start responding to your questions before we’ve even finished putting groceries away. Then you recieved my responses in your email and forget to check it before throwing the WTF at me.

      I didn’t post on the blog last night because I wanted to take some neighbors names out of my email to you.

      So what give’s You only live six houses away and have both of my phone numbers and you know that I love to talk about this stuff. Sorry if you feel that I haven’t involved you. Let’s move forward in a productive manner from here.

      Reply

  4. Anonymous Says:

    3/5

    i have recieved an email reply from MRA. it appears to be detailed and attentive to the questions i have posed. I will review your reply in depth this weekend.Thank you for the response.

    I understand the need to develop funding and support for such a goal, however, I am still of the opinion that MRA is getting out ahead of itself on its current media campaign on the web,and should tone the hype down a bit until Dave Scanlan has a chance to address the local communities and gather feedback from them. Perhaps MRA leadership could take a moment to view things from the perspective of an Alaskan living in one of the three very small, rural communities that stand to be the most affected,and realize that it indeed may be offensive to hear Outsiders hyping up this plan before they have even met and discussed it with the citizens of those communities.

    Again, I understand that meetings with these communities are supposed to be upcoming this spring, but i still feel your media blitz should have waited until this has actually occured.

    I will look forward to further dialogue after i further review your email.

    Thanks,
    SR

    Reply

    • Anonymous Says:

      SR,

      Thanks for your comments. MRA has every intention of receiving feedback from the local communities. We apologize for the “media hype” and are very respectful of the locals.

      Reply

      • Anonymous Says:

        Thank you for your response. If MRA is sincere abouth this, please tone down your hype meter a touch until you hold local community meetings. I am not saying this plan is bad or it needs to be stopped, I just feel it should start at the heart, the core, the community, and then work its way outward. With very little information availble, it is difficult to have a clear overview of this vision.,as well as an open mind ,as the hype is coming from Outside intrests. Kind of like Pebble Mine’s media blitz up here.

        Reply

    • LaMuerta Says:

      I live in Hope and will cross my fingers that this plan happens! Way to go MRA and Dave Scanlan!

      Reply

  5. Anonymous Says:

    DS,
    Since i first heard of this plan from you ,personally,several days before your Girdwood meeting, I have posted detailed questions on this blog, and on threads that MRA has started on other websites,as well as sent an email to the email address linked from this blog, and had recieved no reply .

    Prior to the WTF posting ths morning, I had not recieved your email reply.Since then,it has arrived. Thank you ror reply.It appears to be very detailed and i have not had the time to thoroughly review it.

    Others have been posting questions to MRA through these same venues, and none of the have seen a detailed reply.

    Meanwhile, MRA’s web site, MRA’s blog,MRA’s Facebook page,and Joe Turner and Jamie Schectman’s Facebook pages have all been getting frequent bumps and posts with more hype about the project, MRA has been posting new links to all the hype on various threads on the web,and there is still no hard factual information posted on your sites.Some of things MRA and its leaders are saying ,ver batim,are very bold and presumptuous.

    So, when i saw yet another video on youtube this morning and had still not seen any substantial reply, in frustration I asked WTF?

    Please don’t take the WTF personally. Until now , i had no idea you were the contact they are linking to from their websites,or that you were moderating the MRA blog.

    I tried to delete the post with the WTF but since you replied to it, it wont let me. I also posted that i recieved the email, thanked you for it,and remarked that I would thoroughly review it this weekend.

    I apologize for you taking offense to the remark, but my timeline is accurate,and given al the other hype MRA was posting without addressing any questions, i hope you can empathize with my frustration. I would have enjoyed futher conversation the other night when i saw you, but at those cold temps, the ladies were not so keen on the idea.

    The questions posed above are some but certainly not all that i raised to you personally.

    Perhaps if you had let the community know about this plan before MRA went on its current internet frenzy, we could have avoided some of these issues.

    Thanks for your apology. Its not that i feel like you haven’t involved me, it’s that you have not involved the communties around Manitoba before you allowed your partners at MRA start an internet media campaign hyping your plan.

    I didn’t realize I needed to contact you about your plan, i wrongfully assumed you would disclose your plan to the community.That has not yet happened.

    Again, sorry for you taking offense here,Dave. I really am just looking for solid info and a place to pose questions , both of which seem to be relatively slow in their forthcoming. All my remarks have been directed to MRA,and are not meant as a personal attack on you.

    I look forward to further dialogue and will email you this weekend.

    I admire your personal drive and motivation, and wish you a fruitful return on the energies you have invested here.

    I desire the best for the citizens of this region.I look forward to having enough information available so that I may make an educated
    opinion regarding your plan.

    Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    Cheers!
    SR

    Reply

    • Dscanlan Says:

      No offense taken Dingo. I would have loved to have talked more the other night as well but my feet were turning into ice cubes. Maybe we can get together soon and do some good brain storming. I’m not moderating the blog but emails do come through to me. I’m horrible at media stuff but am trying to learn.

      clear your schedule for Wednesday March 23 Hope Social Hall 7:00p.m. I will be phone calling everyone on the hope phone list to make sure everyone knows. I know a lot of people don’t read anything on the cork board at the P.O.

      Reply

  6. Anonymous Says:

    lucid_insight_from_slick_rick
    Collapse
    DS,
    Since i first heard of this plan from you ,personally,several days before your Girdwood meeting, I have posted detailed questions on this blog, and on threads that MRA has started on other websites,as well as sent an email to the email address linked from this blog, and had recieved no reply .

    Prior to the WTF posting ths morning, I had not recieved your email reply.Since then,it has arrived. Thank you ror reply.It appears to be very detailed and i have not had the time to thoroughly review it.

    Others have been posting questions to MRA through these same venues, and none of the have seen a detailed reply.

    Meanwhile, MRA’s web site, MRA’s blog,MRA’s Facebook page,and Joe Turner and Jamie Schectman’s Facebook pages have all been getting frequent bumps and posts with more hype about the project, MRA has been posting new links to all the hype on various threads on the web,and there is still no hard factual information posted on your sites.Some of things MRA and its leaders are saying ,ver batim,are very bold and presumptuous.

    So, when i saw yet another video on youtube this morning and had still not seen any substantial reply, in frustration I asked WTF?

    Please don’t take the WTF personally. Until now , i had no idea you were the contact they are linking to from their websites,or that you were moderating the MRA blog.

    I tried to delete the post with the WTF but since you replied to it, it wont let me. I also posted that i recieved the email, thanked you for it,and remarked that I would thoroughly review it this weekend.

    I apologize for you taking offense to the remark, but my timeline is accurate,and given al the other hype MRA was posting without addressing any questions, i hope you can empathize with my frustration. I would have enjoyed futher conversation the other night when i saw you, but at those cold temps, the ladies were not so keen on the idea.

    The questions posed above are some but certainly not all that i raised to you personally.

    Perhaps if you had let the community know about this plan before MRA went on its current internet frenzy, we could have avoided some of these issues.

    Thanks for your apology. Its not that i feel like you haven’t involved me, it’s that you have not involved the communties around Manitoba before you allowed your partners at MRA start an internet media campaign hyping your plan.

    I didn’t realize I needed to contact you about your plan, i wrongfully assumed you would disclose your plan to the community.That has not yet happened.

    Again, sorry for you taking offense here,Dave. I really am just looking for solid info and a place to pose questions , both of which seem to be relatively slow in their forthcoming. All my remarks have been directed to MRA,and are not meant as a personal attack on you.

    I look forward to further dialogue and will email you this weekend.

    I admire your personal drive and motivation, and wish you a fruitful return on the energies you have invested here.

    I desire the best for the citizens of this region.I look forward to having enough information available so that I may make an educated
    opinion regarding your plan.

    Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    Cheers!
    SR
    Edit Reply

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    • Bob Scanlan Says:

      Everyone pause and take a deep breath. No one knows the passion Dave Scanlan has for sking like I do. A little history. Dave grew up in Aurora, Illinois—over 4,000 miles from Hope, Alaska. Dave went sking for the first time when he was 6 years old. My wife and I were in charge of a youth group in our local church. We had planned a ski trip to go to Devil’s Head in Wisconsin for one day. That day the temp was -20 with the wind chill -50. Everyone wanted to go so we did not cancel the trip—Dave and our daughter also went along. We thought they could stay in the lodge by the fire. Dave wanted to try sking–so he and I did the bunny hill. At the end of the day Dave begged to go on the ski lift up to the top. As we road the ski lift up we were going directly into the wind— it was surely -50. Dave got off the lift and headed down the hill for the first time. As tears ran down his cheeks in the bitter cold his hands were frozen to the ski poles. He skied directly to the door of the lodge for his last run. At 6 years old Dave was hooked for life. He was featured in an article in Powder Magazine about 12 years ago. Dave is an Alaskan; a skier; a dedicated, passionate person. He and Lana (his wife) have built their own business and are stalwarts of the Hope Alaska community. Just let me know the inital cost to buy a membership in the Manitoba Ski Resoration Project and I will be happy to be the first member. I will never ski there but will support Dave and Lana 1000%. You see I know Dave better than anyone of you. I have known Dave since June 6, 1977 when he was born. No man could be more proud of a son than I am of my son–Dave Scanlan.

      Respectully to all the people who want to enjoy God’s creation leaving a minimal foot print behind.

      Bob Scanlan

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